CHANEL NEWS

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MAKING OF THE CRUISE COLLECTION PRESS KIT

Photo shoot in Paris by Karl Lagerfeld for the Cruise 2015/16 Collection.

Photos by Olivier Saillant

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DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA, SEOUL

Welcoming in 2014 the Culture Chanel exhibition, the Dongdaemun Design Plaza is set to host the Cruise collection 2015/16 show.

Devoid of a single angle or straight line, the world’s largest neo-futurist building, conceived by Zaha Hadid, instead plays out as a cohesive symphony of pure, continuous curves. Like some alien spaceship that has come to land in Seoul, the ovoid silver structure (measuring 86,574 square meters, or 931, 875 square feet) blends seamlessly into the urban landscape with its fluid, harmonious lines.

The gaze ricochets off of this concrete structure sheathed in 45,133 individual aluminum panels, each distinct from the next. Equally spectacular is its interior – all twists and arches – which extends across three levels below ground and four above without the use of a single pillar. Features include a spiral staircase, a cylindrical gallery and spiral corridors, and a bright, Arctic-white lobby with a nine-meter high ceiling. The structure incorporates cultural artifacts discovered during archaeological excavations, including remnants of the ramparts that once surrounded Seoul on four nearby hills, dating back to the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

The first woman ever to win the prestigious Pritzker Prize, Zaha Hadid, born in Baghdad in 1950 but British by adoption, designed the Chanel Mobile Art pavilion in 2008 and is one of the favorite architects of Karl Lagerfeld.

Photos by Panta Creation and Park Haewook ⓒ DDP (Dongdaemun Design Plaza)

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chanel-journeys-into-the-future

CHANEL JOURNEYS INTO THE FUTURE

Seoul, the capital of South Korea, is host to Tower Infinity – the world’s first 'invisible' skyscraper, thanks to advanced technology able to reflect images in real time. One of the world’s largest metropolises, with over 25 million inhabitants and lightning-fast internet connections, Seoul is a symbol of modernity, at once a World Design Capital and one of the most committed green cities. It was recently awarded WWF’s global Earth Hour City Challenge prize, and was recognized by the UN in 2014 for its efforts in climate action, such as encouraging businesses and citizens alike to use renewable energy.

Yet such modernity does not exclude spirituality. Alongside high-tech developments, the religions of Buddhism, Confucianism and shamanism remain part of South Korea’s make-up. No building is built without a ritual appealing to the benevolence of the spirits, while widespread belief in the philosophy of yin and yang is reflected in the design of South Korea’s flag and inspired the region’s traditional hues of blue, white, red, black and yellow. Vivid tokens of luck offering divine protection thus color everyday items, from traditional costumes inspired by the Chôzon dynasty (1392-1910) – dubbed 'Hanbok' – to the faces of young brides, who mark their cheeks with two red dots. A love of nature is another component of the national identity. Koreans can often be found hiking in the mountains, kitted out in the latest sports gear, or walking the 6km (3.7 mile) greenway along the redeveloped banks of the Cheonggyecheon stream in the heart of the capital.

Falling between tradition and the avant-garde is the so-called Korean Wave, a major cultural craze surfing a strong appetite for indigenous pop music, movies and TV shows – in this part of Asia, popular heroines of TV series are said to influence entire generations – which have since spread across the world, thanks to social media.

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