CHANEL NEWS

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© Patrick Dieudonne / robertharding

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© Patrick Dieudonne / robertharding

EL "SAVOIR-FAIRE" DE EXCEPCIÓN
EN LA ISLA DE FAIR

Al norte de Escocia se sitúan los acantilados de la Isla de Fair, una isla de 7,68 km2 entre las Orcadas y Shetland. Es una de las islas más aisladas de Reino Unido y ha conservado tradiciones ancestrales para confeccionar un punto a medida único en el mundo.

El punto de Mati Ventrillon es el reflejo de esta herencia que remonta a la época en la que los insulares navegaban por el mundo entero, entre América y Europa, mientras que sus parejas dedicaban su tiempo a crear motivos cada vez más originales.

El punto, que reproduce fielmente los diseños tradicionales de los siglos XIX y XX, han sido tejidos a mano, en lana Shetland.

Las Colecciones de Métiers d’Art de Chanel rinden homenaje al “savoir-faire” de los artesanos y a su patrimonio tradicional, contribuyendo así a su conservación.

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© Olivier Saillant - Teatro N°5 - Cinecittà Studios - Rome

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© Olivier Saillant - Teatro N°5 - Cinecittà Studios - Rome

THE SHOW BY REBECCA LOWTHORPE

Picture an entire Parisian street scene – complete with bar, restaurant, baker, grocer, florist, Metro station and cinema – and recreate it in the heart of the legendary Roman film studios, Cinecittà, and you have the cinematic setting for Chanel’s 2015 Métiers d’Art show – the collection which every December settles in a different city and celebrates the artisans of Chanel’s specialist ateliers.

Held in Teatro number 5 (of course) - the studio where Federico Fellini filmed his 1960s masterpiece "La Dolce Vita" - Karl Lagerfeld reconstructed the set for "Paris à Rome" in spectacular, meticulous detail. Built entirely in black and white, it not only recalled Italy’s moviemaking heyday with the silver patina of old projector film stock but also the era when Coco Chanel dressed its greatest stars, Jeanne Moreau, Monica Vitti, Anouk Aimée and Romy Schneider for their performances in films directed by Italy’s movie maestros Visconti or Antonioni.

Karl Lagerfeld explained that his ulterior motive for the monochromatic set was that it should bring the clothes into sharp relief, since so many of them played on the classic Chanel palette of black, beige, cream, grey and navy blue. So when the show’s live music began (interpreted by Chistophe Chassol, playing the piano in a restored bandstand) and the models emerged from the set’s Metro station, the clothes were indeed more luminous than ever.

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This was the moment, aside from the typical Parisian street scene, in which there was no doubt we were looking at a collection that could have only ever come out of France, steeped in all things quintessentially French, all things quintessentially Chanel. "That’s why Paris in Rome, that is important," stressed Karl Lagerfeld, "this house is French, the collection is made in France and by the most experienced, talented and best craftspeople in the world". So from the models’ Bardot-esque beehives down to their pearl-embellished mules – a first for this particular shoe shape at Chanel, said Karl Lagerfeld – and from the long tweed jackets draped around the shoulders of slim, saucy silhouettes that included everything from glinting metallic boucle dresses to black lacquered pencil skirts, little black dresses pleated to perfection and the new three-piece suit (a jacket, straight skirt and cigarette trousers), all worn with kinky lacy tights, the overarching mood was, at first, distinctly Parisian.

But the magic of the show, and collection, was how Karl Lagerfeld directed the development of his multi-faceted Paris in Rome plot. Just as the palette began to appear tinged with Rome’s famous golden light - ochre and orange through cappuccino and pink – so too did the fabrics became richer, embellished with everything from witty surface detail such as a leather pencil skirt that resembled tiny bows of "Farfalle" pasta to feathers that had been hand-painted to resemble marble. Dresses’ necklines grew into short papal capes and the most exquisite cashmere came overlaid with rosary-jewelled necklaces. One dress, a cocoon-like bubble constructed in petals of vibrant coral, seemed to hark back to a time when couture was centred in Rome as well as Paris.

But more than anything the collection showcased Chanel as the paradigm of French chic together with the breathtaking virtuosity of its artisans who know no bounds whichever city or culture the Métiers d’Art collections’ inspiration spring from. At the end of the show, the backdrop sprang to life – the doors of every establishment flung open to serve pasta, pizza and gelato – a fitting metaphor for the bustling existence of Chanel’s specialist ateliers and their transformative powers.

INSIDE THE MAISONS D’ART

Paris in Rome 2015/16 Métiers d'Art

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LACE STOCKINGS AND MULES

"The mule... It's a typical Chanel shoe, open behind, but we had never done it. With a lace stocking, it's something which, in people's minds, is very Paris." Karl Lagerfeld

℗ Tricatel

SOUNDTRACK BY MICHEL GAUBERT

French musician Chassol live performance at the Paris in Rome 2015/16 Métiers d'Art show.

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© Anne Combaz

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© Anne Combaz

THE ART OF EMBROIDERY

Fine embroidery is the traditional craft of creating flat or raised motifs using a variety of materials, from cotton and sequins to cabochons, feathers, crystals, and pendants, on fabrics ranging from light, airy organza and chiffon to stiff, resistant leather and tweed.

Ornamenting a garment begins with a design which is pricked out on a paper pattern, then transferred to the fabric using a special blend (of resin and chalk).
The embroidery materials are attached one by one using a needle or crochet hook. It takes on average some 20 hours to make up a sample, which will then be presented in a frame.

One key technique is "Lunéville" embroidery, which takes its name from the French town of the same name. The technique dates from 1867, when it was invented to simplify and speed up needlework. It involves using a crochet hook to chain stitch small decorations such as tiny beads, sequins, and thread to the underside of the fabric.
The embroiderer works blind, guided solely by her experience and her dexterous fingers.

One witty innovation this year are the leather “farfalle” bows embroidered with beads, specially designed by the Maison Lesage for the Paris in Rome 2015/16 Métiers d'Art show.

Cinecittà Studios - Roma

MÉTIERS D'ART PARIS IN ROME 2015/16
LA PELÍCULA

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Jeanne Moreau © Keystone France
Romy Schneider © Cortesía de Paul Ronald, Archivio Storico del Cinema, AFE
Delphine Seyrig © Keystone France
Anouk Aimée y Federico Fellini © Photo D.R

ACTRICES VESTIDAS
POR GABRIELLE CHANEL

¿Por qué Gabrielle Chanel aprecia tanto a las actrices? ¿Será porque domina perfectamente el arte del vestuario o porque en su juventud ella misma subía a los escenarios? En 1910 una de las primeras en llevar públicamente sus sombreros no fue otra que la actriz Gabrielle Dorziat.

Veinte años más tarde, la costurera se convirtió en una referencia para el séptimo arte, tanto dentro de EE.UU. como fuera. En 1931, Gloria Swanson, gran actriz del cine mudo, lució un vestido largo Chanel en “Esta noche o nunca”. En 1955, Marilyn Monroe atrajo la atención del mundo entero cuando confirmó que dormía sólo con unas gotas de Chanel Nº5.

En noviembre de 1958 apareció publicada la siguiente frase en la revista Elle “todo el cine quiso vestirse de Chanel”. Es cierto que tenía como clientas a numerosas actrices. Los cineastas y en especial aquellos de la Nouvelle Vague, solicitaron a Gabrielle Chanel para vestir a las protagonistas: femmes fatales interpretadas por Jeanne Moreau en 1958 en “Los Amantes” de Louis Malle o por Delphine Seyrig en “El año pasado en Marienbad” en 1961.

Tanto en la gran pantalla como en la ciudad, Gabrielle Chanel vistió a Annie Girardot y Brigitte Bardot. Era amiga de Anouk Aimée, hablaba de literatura con Jeanne Moreau, y se convirtió en el pigmalión y admiradora de Romy Schneider, desvelando sus secretos de seducción a unas y enseñando el arte de vestirse a otras.

Cinecittà Studios - Rome

LA ENTREVISTA KARL LAGERFELD

Por Rebecca Lowthorpe

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© Benoit Peverelli

EL BACKSTAGE DEL DESFILE

Colección Métiers d'Art Paris in Rome 2015/16

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