CHANEL NEWS

credits
credits

© Olivier Saillant

staging-the-show-at-the-elbphilharmonie

© Olivier Saillant

STAGING THE SHOW
AT THE ELBPHILHARMONIE

The Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg is home to three concert halls, including the Grand Hall with room for 2,100 people. The architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron took particular pains in designing the surfaces and their interplay of textures, especially for the inner spaces, which are clad in a "white skin" consisting of thousands of precision-cut gypsum fiber panels fitted to within a millimeter, giving the space unbeatable acoustics. Creating the space called not only for cutting-edge digital technology, but also the immense talent of the Japanese acoustic engineer Yasuhisa Toyota.

The very shape of the auditorium is innovative. The stage is in the center, overhung by a curved ceiling that, as the architects put it, "rises vertically like a tent". Its imposing shape dictated the form of the building’s outer shell. Here, virtuoso technology draws on an in-depth mastery of tradition. Here, where heritage and modernity come together, is where Karl Lagerfeld chose to present the Paris-Hamburg 2017/18 Métiers d’art show.

00/8
paris-hamburg-silhouettes

PARIS-HAMBURG
SILHOUETTES

First images of the Paris-Hamburg 2017/18 Métiers d’art collection photographed by Karl Lagerfeld.

#CHANELMetiersdArt

00/14
shooting-by-karl-lagerfeld

© Olivier Saillant

SHOOTING BY KARL LAGERFELD

The artistic director of the House has chosen German model Anna Ewers to present the silhouettes of the Métiers d’art 2017/18 collection, that will be showcased in Hamburg.

#CHANELinHamburg

embroidery-and-silkwork-by-maison-montex

EMBROIDERY AND SILKWORK
BY MAISON MONTEX

Contemporary embroidery studio based in Paris, Maison Montex designs exclusive motifs and new creations every seasons that enhance the House Métiers d’art collections. With its thousands of sequins, beads, threads, multicolored crystals, and other embellishments, Maison Montex has forged its own distinctive expertise, drawing on the knowledge of an embroiderer from the Lorraine—the cradle of embroidery in France thereby perpetuating the secrets of the Lunéville craft. Thanks to research and experimentation, historic skills like crochet, embroidery on a Cornely machine, and needlework are being transcended by new techniques such lace embroidery on newsprint and 3D effects.

More information on mtxparis.com

the-art-of-cashmere-by-maison-barrie

THE ART OF CASHMERE
BY MAISON BARRIE

The Barrie knitwear mill in the small town of Hawick, Scotland, joined CHANEL in 2012, twenty-five years after completing its first orders for the company. Their shared creative vision has brought the ancient tradition of the finest cashmere woven in the Scottish borders to CHANEL's iconic two-tone cardigan.

The Maison Barrie's soft-hued palette offers a range of exclusive colors for the Métiers d'art collections. Its spools in various sizes give an exceptional quality of yarn, while a production method unchanged since the early twentieth century, requiring painstaking accuracy and dexterity, makes the cashmere soft yet strong, giving a knit of outstanding quality. A highly qualified workforce with a skillset that is now rare makes Barrie cashmere knits a true luxury.

More information on barrie.com

jewelry-buttons-from-the-maison-desrues

JEWELRY BUTTONS FROM
THE MAISON DESRUES

The buttons and jewelry specialists Maison Desrues create unusual bespoke pieces to designs by Karl Lagerfeld, from cuff bracelets and fingerless gloves set with stones to beads on long necklaces or stitched by the hundred on every inch of a garment. Desrues produces some four thousand buttons a day to adorn CHANEL designs. The craftsmen also cast, sculpt, dye, carve, enamel, and polish stones and settings from Gabrielle Chanel's own jewelry, giving a new lease of life in fresh designs for today's collections. To meet the demands of CHANEL's bespoke creations, the Maison Desrues has embraced new technologies including digital design and laser cutting. Yet the company still holds itself to the highest standards of craftsmanship.

More information on desrues-paris.com

in-the-steps-of-maison-massaro-bootmaker-and-shoemaker

IN THE STEPS OF MAISON MASSARO,
BOOTMAKER AND SHOEMAKER

Maison Massaro, who produced the two-tone shoes designed by Gabrielle Chanel in 1957, joined the CHANEL Maisons d’art in 2002. The master bootmaker creates Karl Lagerfeld’s designs that enrich the stylistic vocabulary of CHANEL by constantly seeking out new shapes and materials. Transparent plastic pumps, jeweled sandals, gaiter boots, and beaded heels all point to Maison Massaro’s creativity and sheer mastery of its art. The Massaro studio offers expertise in a number of crafts demanding a high degree of technical skill, offering endless possibilities in terms of design.

More information on massaro.fr

feathers-and-floral-adornments-by-maison-lemarie

FEATHERS AND FLORAL ADORNMENTS
BY MAISON LEMARIÉ

Lemarié, which began working with feathers in Paris in 1880 and expanded to produce artificial flowers in 1946, is now at the heart of Karl Lagerfeld’s designs and also works with many other fashion houses. Working with feathers and flowers offers an infinite range of potential textures and patterns and requires ingenuity and technical flair. It was Maison Lemarié that Gabrielle Chanel turned to when she first came up with her camellia design in the 1960s. The emblematic flower blooms anew each season in Karl Lagerfeld’s sketches.

Though expert in flowers and feathers, Lemarié excels in the subtle inlaying, cascades of flounces, pleats and sophisticated smocking in a range of shapes and textures, from organza to velvet, leather to tweed and and satin.

More information on lemarie-paris.fr

credits
credits

© Olivier Saillant

the-elbphilharmonie

© Olivier Saillant

THE ELBPHILHARMONIE

The Elbphilharmonie concert hall standing on the bank of the river Elbe in the old port area of Hamburg, which has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, is the city’s new cultural landmark. It was designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron and symbolizes the past, the present, and the future. Built atop the original brick walls of a former cocoa warehouse, the glass structure has a roof in the shape of waves, rising to a height of 110 meters. This scale of the edifice echoes that of the ocean-going vessels berthed opposite in the port. Its strange silhouette stands out in this very horizontal city. The glass facade, made up partly of curved window panels, makes it look like a giant crystal set over the old buildings. This new building is the showcase venue for the Paris-Hamburg 2017/18 Métiers d’art show.

Share

The link has been copied