CHANEL NEWS

in-the-steps-of-maison-massaro-bootmaker-and-shoemaker

IN THE STEPS OF MAISON MASSARO,
BOOTMAKER AND SHOEMAKER

Maison Massaro, who produced the two-tone shoes designed by Gabrielle Chanel in 1957, joined the CHANEL Maisons d’art in 2002. The master bootmaker creates Karl Lagerfeld’s designs that enrich the stylistic vocabulary of CHANEL by constantly seeking out new shapes and materials. Transparent plastic pumps, jeweled sandals, gaiter boots, and beaded heels all point to Maison Massaro’s creativity and sheer mastery of its art. The Massaro studio offers expertise in a number of crafts demanding a high degree of technical skill, offering endless possibilities in terms of design.

More information on massaro.fr

feathers-and-floral-adornments-by-maison-lemarie

FEATHERS AND FLORAL ADORNMENTS
BY MAISON LEMARIÉ

Lemarié, which began working with feathers in Paris in 1880 and expanded to produce artificial flowers in 1946, is now at the heart of Karl Lagerfeld’s designs and also works with many other fashion houses. Working with feathers and flowers offers an infinite range of potential textures and patterns and requires ingenuity and technical flair. It was Maison Lemarié that Gabrielle Chanel turned to when she first came up with her camellia design in the 1960s. The emblematic flower blooms anew each season in Karl Lagerfeld’s sketches.

Though expert in flowers and feathers, Lemarié excels in the subtle inlaying, cascades of flounces, pleats and sophisticated smocking in a range of shapes and textures, from organza to velvet, leather to tweed and and satin.

More information on lemarie-paris.fr

credits
credits

© Olivier Saillant

the-elbphilharmonie

© Olivier Saillant

THE ELBPHILHARMONIE

The Elbphilharmonie concert hall standing on the bank of the river Elbe in the old port area of Hamburg, which has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, is the city’s new cultural landmark. It was designed by the Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron and symbolizes the past, the present, and the future. Built atop the original brick walls of a former cocoa warehouse, the glass structure has a roof in the shape of waves, rising to a height of 110 meters. This scale of the edifice echoes that of the ocean-going vessels berthed opposite in the port. Its strange silhouette stands out in this very horizontal city. The glass facade, made up partly of curved window panels, makes it look like a giant crystal set over the old buildings. This new building is the showcase venue for the Paris-Hamburg 2017/18 Métiers d’art show.

the-art-of-pleating-by-the-maison-lognon

THE ART OF PLEATING BY
THE MAISON LOGNON

The Maison Lognon allies traditional craft skills and digital technology in its cutting-edge techniques. Its deft-fingered experts create elaborate interplays of volume in flat expanses of fabric in a highly demanding process that requires painstaking accuracy and detailed knowledge of the characteristics of each material. Perfect pleating takes unspoken coordination and perfect fingertip synchronisation from two pleaters working together.

Over the decades, Lognon has worked with a wide range of fabrics, from silk, crepe, tulle, and chiffon to organza, velvet and leather. It has developed its own specialist jargon: reclining, flat, hollow, round, accordion, Watteau, sunburst, and Fortuny are all types of pleating mastered by Lognon, shedding light on the history of technical innovations in fashion. The company's history is still being written, as Lognon works closely with the CHANEL Studio, since it joined CHANEL's Métiers d’art in 2013.

Share

The link has been copied