CHANEL NEWS

KARL LAGERFELD TALKS ABOUT THE SHOW

Interview by Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni after the Métiers d'Art Paris-Salzburg 2014/15 show.

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THE CHANEL JACKET
BY FRANÇOISE-CLAIRE PRODHON

The story of the Chanel jacket all began with the invention of the suit in the early 1950s. This modern, comfortable garment, combining masculine and feminine elements, was Gabrielle Chanel's answer to the style of the 1950s, which she considered too constraining and not adapted to women's lives.
"A Chanel suit is made for a woman who moves," said Gabrielle Chanel, adding: "I really care about women, and I wanted to dress them in clothes that make them feel at ease, clothes they can wear to drive a car, but that still emphasize femininity". It was immediately successful, and the suit along with its jacket became essential items in women's wardrobes, the synonym of freedom and casual elegance.
The jacket, worn with a wrap-around skirt, is unique, taking inspiration from traditional Austrian men's jackets. This jacket in tweed, one of Mademoiselle Chanel's signature fabrics, was designed like a second skin: straight, structured, with an edge-to-edge closure and no shoulder pads or stiff interfacing.

To reconcile flexibility and support, the jacket front is cut on the grain, without darts at the bust. The back is cut the same way, simply separated by a center seam. Vertical side panels join the front and back. The sleeve, cut on the grain, meets the bodice at the top of the shoulder. It is slightly angled with darts at the elbow to follow the shape of the arm for ease of movement and comfort. To ensure this perfect freedom of movement, Mademoiselle Chanel would take her customers' measurements with their arms crossed and hands resting on their shoulders. The silk lining of the jacket is cut with the same criteria ensuring comfort. A delicate chain sewn into the lower part of the jacket ensures that it falls impeccably. The graphic aspect is emphasized by the braid (grosgrain braid, knitted, etc.) that outlines the contours of the jacket, the pocket edges, and the cuffs. The pockets are placed to make it easy to slip the hands in. The jacket is done up with jewel-like buttons stamped with the lion's head motif (Mademoiselle Chanel's astrological sign was Leo), sheaves of wheat, camellia, or the double C logo.

Reinvented every season, the jacket has become one of the iconic elements of the Chanel style. "Actually, the Chanel jacket is inspired by the traditional Austrian men's jacket. Coco Chanel invented a type of garment that did not exist in this exact form, and this is an achievement that no one can take away from her. It is one of the symbols that defines the Chanel style." As Karl Lagerfeld has said, "In the world of fashion, some things never go out of fashion: jeans, a white shirt and a Chanel jacket".

Françoise Claire Prodhon

© Benoit Peverelli

1. SCIENCE & INDUSTRYAndy Stott
00:31
  • 1. SCIENCE & INDUSTRY00:31
    Andy Stott
  • 2. MR MOUSTAFA00:31
    Alexandre Desplat
  • 3. CONCERTO FOR LUTE AND PLUCKED STRINGS I. MODERATO00:29
    Siegfried Behrend
  • 4. SNOWBIRD00:35
    Clark
  • 5. DAYLIGHT EXPRESS TO LUTZ00:31
    Alexandre Desplat

SHOW PLAYLIST BY MICHEL GAUBERT

00/30
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MÉTIERS D'ART PARIS-SALZBURG SHOW

Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg.
View the full collection on chanel.com

Photos by Olivier Saillant

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THE SHOW DECOR

December 2nd, Schloss Leopoldskron, Salzburg.

© Olivier Saillant

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MAKING OF THE PRESS KIT

Métiers d'Art Paris-Salzburg 2014/15 collection.

© Olivier Saillant

"REINCARNATION" BY KARL LAGERFELD
FILM MAKING OF

Behind the scene features of Karl Lagerfeld's new short film made to accompany the 2014/15 Métiers d'Art show.
To watch the movie "Reincarnation", visit chanel.com

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CHANEL AND AUSTRIA
BY FRANÇOISE-CLAIRE PRODHON

Austria captivated Gabrielle Chanel with its charm, atmosphere and mountainous landscape. She loved nature, sport and outdoor activities as much as cultural events and high society: Austria offered it all. In a letter to Jean Cocteau on July 16, 1922 she wrote: "Tzara is in Tirol - seems to be feeling better and happy - perhaps I will go there too". Like many artists at that time, Tristan Tzara was there with Max Ernst and Paul Eluard, other members of the Dada movement.
Since the mid-nineteenth century, Salzburg and the Austrian Tirol had become highly desirable destinations. This popularity was confirmed in 1920, when director Max Reinhardt, composer Richard Strauss and author Hugo von Hofmannsthal created the Salzburg Festival, an annual summer operatic festival attracting a cultured and elegant audience.

In the early 1930s, Gabrielle Chanel loved to visit the famous ski station of Saint-Moritz, and it was here that she met Baron Hubert von Pantz, a dashing Austrian aristocrat. Elegant and courtly, he had all the traits to charm Gabrielle Chanel, with whom he had a two-year affair. In these early years of the 1930s, he bought Schloss Mittersill, a castle he transformed into a prestigious luxury hotel.

Schloss Mittersill was an instant success and in 1936, the American edition of Vogue magazine referred to it as: "the most talked-of place in Austria". With his high standards and exquisite manners, Hubert von Pantz attracted high ranking guests from the elite, including the Duc de Gramont and the Marquise de Polignac; but also artists such as Marlene Dietrich, Douglas Fairbanks and Cole Porter, all drawn in by the hotel's refined atmosphere as well as its traditional character. It offered many activities, ranging from golf to hikes on the glaciers, as well as shopping, an opportunity for this swanky clientèle to buy traditional Loden garments. It was at Mittersill that Gabrielle Chanel noticed the impeccable jackets worn by the hotel's elevator operators… A garment that she would remember in the early 1950s, when she created the iconic jacket of the Chanel suit, worn in 1961 by her friend, Austrian-born actress Romy Schneider...

Françoise-Claire Prodhon

The actress Romy Schneider during a fitting with Gabrielle Chanel in 1961
Giancarlo Botti ©BOTTI/STILLS/GAMMA

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